<p>
	Sarah Riggs, from <em>Rābiʻa Journal</em>, forthcoming in TCR 3.30 (Fall 2016)</p>
<p>
	Sarah Riggs, from <em>Rābiʻa Journal</em>, forthcoming in TCR 3.30 (Fall 2016)</p>

Sarah Riggs, from Rābiʻa Journal, forthcoming in TCR 3.30 (Fall 2016)

The SFU English Department, the SFU World Literature Program, and The Capilano Review are pleased to welcome visiting writer and translator Sarah Riggs for three upcoming events:

SFU Reading
Thursday December 1st
12:30 – 1:30 pm
SFU Special Collections
Bennett Library Room 7100

Sarah will be reading from her new book Pomme and Granite (1913 Press), as well as from new work related to the 8th-century Muslim mystic and poet Rabi’a al Adawiyyah, a woman of great importance within the Sufi tradition and Arabic poetry generally.
 
TCR Translation Supper-Seminar
Thursday December 1st
6:00 – 9:00 pm
The Capilano Review offices
281 Industrial Avenue (upstairs)
Buffet dinner at 6:00
Seminar at 7:00
RSVP at contact@thecapilanoreview.ca by November 20 to save your spot and receive further materials

Cost: $5-$20 sliding scale
 
The translation seminar is of interest to those engaged in literary translation, but also anyone concerned with questions and problems that translation provokes: hospitality and the barriers to sharing, fidelity and infidelity, transfer and transference, the possible and the impossible, expansiveness and loss of self, collaboration and theft. 

TCR 3.29 & 3.30 Launch
Friday December 2nd 
7:00 – 10:00
The Capilano Review
281 Industrial Avenue (downstairs)

As a contributor to TCR’s Fall issue, Sarah will also be reading as part of the magazine’s double-issue launch. 

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SARAH RIGGS is a writer and artist, born in New York where she is now based, after having spent over a decade in Paris. Before directing Six Lives: A Cinepoem, she produced The Tangier 8 at the Cinémathèque de Tanger in Morocco, which was screened at the Berlin Film Festival and the Tate Modern Museum among other international venues. She is the author of five books of poetry in English: Waterwork (Chax, 2007), Chain of Minuscule Decisions in the Form of a Feeling (Reality Street, 2007), 60 Textos (Ugly Duckling, 2010), Autobiography of Envelopes (Burning Deck, 2012), and Pomme & Granite (1913 Press, 2015), which won a 1913 poetry prize. She is the author of the book of essays Word Sightings: Poetry and Visual Media in Stevens, Bishop, & O’Hara (Routledge, 2002), and has translated and co-translated six books of contemporary French poetry into English, including most recently Oscarine Bosquet’s Present Participle (La Presse).  She is the director of the international arts organization Tamaas (www.tamaas.org) which has ongoing projects in performance, translation, and artistic collaboration in Morocco and France. She is also a member of bilingual poetry association Double Change (www.doublechange.org). Riggs is currently teaching at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn after years of teaching at the NYU and Columbia programs in Paris, and before that at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she got her Ph.D. in literature. Inspired by filming the dance of Stéphane Bouquet, choreographed by Mathilde Monnier for the Essaouira section of Six Lives, she did a residency in Casablanca mixing film, dance, and poetry with La Source du Lion in 2015. 

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Accessibility information:

Arts Factory Upstairs

There is a 42"-wide ramp leading to the entrance of the Arts Factory. All single doors (including the front entrance, bathroom door, and bathroom-stall doors) are 34". There is one fully-accessible stall in bathroom.

A lift is available for access to the second floor of the building, where this event will be held.

Arts Factory Downstairs

Entrance to the event space is street level, through a 4-metre-wide entry into a long gallery-type reading hall. Seating is a mix of (different kinds of) chairs and five benches that seat 5-6 people each. There is one fully-accessible stall in bathroom. All single doors in the building (including the bathroom door and bathroom-stall door) are 34". 

*Parking is scarce in the area so we recommend public-transiting, biking, or walking if feasible.